Understanding Borderline Trauma: Rita Marshall

First Aired: 10-01-2013 -- 3 comments | Add comment

Why are so many trauma survivors, especially women, diagnosed “borderline?” Is the label useful — or sexist and degrading? How can people who live through intergenerational violence be understood and supported — instead of discounted and silenced?

Rita Marshall, human rights activist and former psychiatric inmate from a family of Holocaust survivors, examines the social and political context for the controversial “Borderline Personality Disorder” diagnosis.

Share on Facebook35Tweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+0Share on Reddit0Pin on Pinterest1Share on LinkedIn4Email this to someone

3 comments on “Understanding Borderline Trauma: Rita Marshall

  1. This was the richest, most helpful conversation I’ve heard that addresses the effects of the BPD diagnosis. I have listened to it several times and expect to continue to refer to it in the future. Every time I hear it something new resonates with me and helps deepen my understanding of trauma and its effects, as well as the harm that can so often occur as a result of this diagnosis. Thank you for this worthwhile contribution.

    Reply
    1. “This was the richest, most helpful conversation I’ve heard that addresses the effects of the BPD diagnosis. I have listened to it several times and expect to continue to refer to it in the future. Every time I hear it something new resonates with me and helps deepen my understanding of trauma and its effects, as well as the harm that can so often occur as a result of this diagnosis. Thank you for this worthwhile contribution.”

      yes to this
      i also think the ruta mazellis interview is fantastic: http://www.madnessradio.net/madness-radio-ruta-mazelis-cutting-edge-self-injury-9-27-06/

      it cannot be measured what effect it has on anyone (mostly women!) to tell them: you have “bpd”. it is totally like being told you’re a child molester. you are not a person. you stop treating yourself as a person.

      i completely stopped having contacts and friendships of any sort to protect others from me. i still feel that my mere presence is incredibly awful to anyone. the so-called “diagnosis” fit well with harassment i was experiencing (about being fat and therefore ugly). now i had “scientific proof” that the harrassers were right.
      well done, psychiatry!

      listen to paula caplan: do away with this harmful bullshit!!

      Reply
  2. “i completely stopped having contacts and friendships of any sort to protect others from me.”
    ^^^^ THIS
    I have been struggling with this since I first discovered the “Borderline” label. it is so harmful, and so awful, and just…terrible. 🙁
    To all the borderline-diagnosed folks out there – love yourselves. you are not evil. you are not wrong. your being is not sick. remember that.

    Reply
Click on a tab to select how you'd like to leave your comment

Join the Conversation! Leave a Reply or Comment:

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Comments Protected by WP-SpamShield Spam Filter